LOOK AT YOU NOW Discussion Guide As parents with growing teenagers, most of us struggle to find a small view into their minds. Look at You Now, offers parents a chance to discuss with their teenagers many of the issues they are currently facing, or will eventually be facing. Talking about the events and characters of this story can give families a chance to share their thoughts and idea’s, and learn from one another in a way that doesn’t feel confrontational.  Sex, love, parenting, self-reliance, friendship, deception, shame, and adversity: all of these are subjects that readers can begin to explore through conversations about this book. When I shared this story for the first time with my own three teenagers—the story of what happened in 1979, when I was seventeen years old—I never imagined the discussion it would elicit.  My children were open and informed about sex, their idea’s about…

Hi Liz, I emailed you last week and realized I actually do want to ask your advice about something. I have this friend, Cass. Cass and I have been friends for about 2 years. She used to date my roommate and they went through a bad, prolonged break up last winter. I stayed friends with both and played diplomat. They would ask me about each other all the time. Cass would pump me for information about her ex and I would tell her, with the promise that she would not repeat the information to him as it would be obvious who it had come from. She betrayed this promise multiple times, sometimes barely waiting 10 minutes before emailing the ex. It made me look terrible, for multiple reasons. I guess I felt like I should tell her because she was involving me in a conspiracy with her, the basis of…

I’m a huge fan of riding a bike to work in the summer. I can’t think of a simpler way to save money, help the environment and squeeze in a little exercise. It’s funny, then, that I keep not doing it. It’s sort of astonishing, really. I mean, I’ve actually never done it. Still haven’t made it to Six Flags, in spite of my kids’ repeated pleas. Haven’t built a lemonade stand or grown our own basil or, come to think of it, planted our flower boxes. I was definitely going to teach my daughter to dive this summer. Here it is two weeks before school resumes and I have not once packed a picnic breakfast, roused my children from bed and watched the sun rise from one of this city’s incongruously splendid beaches. I can’t quite get my head around summer. Am I doing it wrong? Or is it…